Cloudscape Reviews


Swan Song – Vancouver Sun

In the Vancouver Sun, Stuart Derdeyn reviews Swan Song, our music-themed anthology:

“The material is delightfully varied and explores music across all kinds of genres and touches on everything from science to cultural theory, sci-fi and fantasy and even some spores with killer harmonies…. Enjoy honest expressions of why Tegan and Sara are so important to so many (‘Tegan and Sara and Me’ by James Brandi) to Emily Cowan’s wonderful ‘The Sound of Silence,’ all about not really being into music much at all. That her work selects The Young Canadians’ ‘I Hate Music’ as a muse is all the better…. As an introduction to the collective’s output, Swan Song takes flight. It’s also a perfect seasonal gift for anyone with a penchant for graphic novels and/or music.”

For more, read Book Review: Swan Song.

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Feast of Fields – Broken Pencil

Jean Matthew reviews Sean Karemaker’s Feast of Fields in Broken Pencil #80:

“Autobiographical comics have never looked quite like Sean Karemaker’s Feast of Fields. The comic features wide, hand-drawn and intensely detailed black-and-white illustrations. Karemaker shares stories from his childhood, his time at school, and his evolving relationship with his mother…. The characters are constantly set as tiny figures in a large setting that span neighbourhoods, blocks, and intersections of an entire house…. Overall, Feast of Fields represents the deftness of a great writer and illustrator to translate highly personal anecdotes into a valuable reading experience. A truly great read and a promising start to this autobiographical comic series.”

For more, read “Feast of Fields Represents the Deftness of a Great Writer and Illustrator.”

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Swan Song – UBC Arts Report

Ashley Park on the Arts Report (on CiTR-FM, UBC’s radio station) talks about Swan Song, Cloudscape’s music-themed anthology. She discusses the anthology’s variety of topics, which stories stood out for her in particular, and each story approaches the themes differently. In particular, she enjoyed how each story was linked to a particular song.:

“It was so much fun because I would type [the song] on Youtube, and I would listen to the music, and then I would read the comic itself …. It was such a cool thing to do because… as artists we kind of have music on , just kind of zone out and go with the flow. You have sounds going on, but you are feeling the music and expressing it in its own way. So I like the sounds and the art going together.”

To listen to the full review go to Arts Report July 18, 2018.

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Bones of the Coast – Fake Geek Girls

Fake Geek Girls is a podcast that explores pop culture from both a fan and critical perspective. Its “Children’s Horror” installment looks at Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Over the Garden Wall… and Bones of the Coast!

“If you like ‘earthy’ horror… it’s very, very Pacific Northwest…. The anthology takes what I love about the Pacific Northwest: the dreariness; it’s dreary but it’s also vibrant because everything is green…. It takes that and the fact that it can be very damp and very isolated. I really, really enjoyed that.”

To hear more about Bones of the Coast and other horror, check out Fake Geek Girls #53: Children’s Horror.

 

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Bones of the Coast – Marie Does Book Reviews

Our horror anthology, Bones of the Coast, was reviewed by the blog “Marie Does Book Reviews“:

“Bones of the Coast is an awesome, scary, beautiful anthology and I have mixed feelings about it. Good mixed feelings! All of the stories contained inside are both interesting and, well, vaguely upsetting. Which was probably the point…. This anthology also serves to show that every visual and narrative style can be used to make a great story. From Kevin Forbes and Reetta Linjama’s classic storytelling in ‘The Logging Road’ to Sean Karemaker’s more stylistic approach in ‘The Ghosts We Know,’ all of these stories are not just effective at, well, telling a story, but also at conveying an atmosphere, which is what more than half of what horror is about in the end. It’s not what the story tells you, it’s what it makes you feel.

To read more, check out Marie’s review of Bones of the Coast: Tales of Terror of the Pacific Northwest.

 

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Bones of the Coast – Vancouver Is Awesome 2

The blog Vancouver Is Awesome has posted a review of our latest anthology: Bones of the Coast. Reviewer Bob Kronbauer:

“wound up being completely engaged from cover to cover, partly due to the great writing and eclectic styles of more than 20 artists, but because it really screams ‘British Columbia.’ From the Skytrain to BC Ferries to logging roads and the Sea to Sky Highway, the settings are all familiar. The subject matter as well; invasive species, camping, Japanese internment during WWII and more. It’s all wrapped into a horror theme so these somewhat inert subjects (aside from internment, which was actual horror) create worlds that we haven’t entirely inhabited but are still close to.”

To read more, check-out the full Bones of the Coast review.

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