Ghost World

Review by Matthew Nielsen

Ghost World! Daniel Clowes’ classic graphic novel is the story of two young women in their teens: Enid and Becky. Clowes is very good at capturing how people (at least certain people) talk about others and the world around them. The main characters feel that a lot of these people lead sad and creepy lives. But surely that’s how many of us see the world? We see others as rotten, crappy, lame, or weird as all hell. You might not want to admit it, but plenty of people out there freely say it casually among each other, and this story certain shows you that side: the personal conversations we have with our closest friends about those we like to feel superior to.

The art is done in black, white, and a funky aqua or something. I love it! Clowes does a great job capturing all the sorts of facial details and expression, making them often gross, weird, or surreal. But that’s life — there is a lot of grossness and weirdness in the world. Some artists might polish away some of these things, making their characters all look more charming, but Clowes keeps the strangeness all there. Though sometimes the faces look a bit derpy, but that’s realistic enough too. All this reminds me a lot of Daria. So yeah, if you liked Daria, there is a good chance you’ll like this, but Ghost World is a bit meaner in comparison.

If you’ve seen the Ghost World movie, you’ll find that the book is in many ways quite different, and the arc goes off in a different direction. Just keep that in mind if you already saw the movie.  Not sure how much you’ll relate to the main characters of Ghost World, but maybe it’s worth finding out. Give it a look!


Bones of the Coast – Fake Geek Girls

Fake Geek Girls is a podcast that explores pop culture from both a fan and critical perspective. Its “Children’s Horror” installment looks at Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Over the Garden Wall… and Bones of the Coast!

“If you like ‘earthy’ horror… it’s very, very Pacific Northwest…. The anthology takes what I love about the Pacific Northwest: the dreariness; it’s dreary but it’s also vibrant because everything is green…. It takes that and the fact that it can be very damp and very isolated. I really, really enjoyed that.”

To hear more about Bones of the Coast and other horror, check out Fake Geek Girls #53: Children’s Horror.

 


May 24 – Cloudscape HQ will be closed because we’ll be at the Vancouver Public Library

On May 24, Cloudscape will not be having itself regular Wednesday meeting because we’ll be at the Vancouver Public Library, listening to two local comic creators read from their graphic novels:

Incite with Jillian Tamaki and Guy Delisle
Two accomplished graphic novelists help the Writers Festival close out Incite 2017 with readings from their highly anticipated new books. Jillian Tamaki, cartoonist of This One Summer and Supermutant Magic Academy, returns with a collection of short comics about the vanishing boundary between the virtual and “real” worlds. Meanwhile, Guy Delisle tells the true and harrowing story of Christophe Andre, a Doctors Without Borders administrator who was kidnapped and held in solitary confinement for 3 months in 1997.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017
7:30pm (Doors at 7)
Vancouver Public Library – Central Branch – Alice McKay Room
Free – RSVP recommended

Additional details can be found at Incite: An Exploration of Books and Ideas.
Remember, there will be no regular Cloudscape meeting on that date. We hope to see all of you at the reading instead.

Bones of the Coast – Marie Does Book Reviews

Our horror anthology, Bones of the Coast, was reviewed by the blog “Marie Does Book Reviews“:

“Bones of the Coast is an awesome, scary, beautiful anthology and I have mixed feelings about it. Good mixed feelings! All of the stories contained inside are both interesting and, well, vaguely upsetting. Which was probably the point…. This anthology also serves to show that every visual and narrative style can be used to make a great story. From Kevin Forbes and Reetta Linjama’s classic storytelling in ‘The Logging Road’ to Sean Karemaker’s more stylistic approach in ‘The Ghosts We Know,’ all of these stories are not just effective at, well, telling a story, but also at conveying an atmosphere, which is what more than half of what horror is about in the end. It’s not what the story tells you, it’s what it makes you feel.

To read more, check out Marie’s review of Bones of the Coast: Tales of Terror of the Pacific Northwest.

 


In the Shadow of No Towers

Review by Matthew Nielsen

In the Shadow of No Towers by Art Spiegelman explores the thoughts and personal experiences of the artist during and after the September 11 attacks. He was there in New York City when it happened, and witnessed the damage and chaos that took place.

This is a pretty large book, about 26cm x 37cm (roughly 10 inches by 14.5 inches), and pretty thick despite having only 42 pages. This is because the pages are thick bits of card. This not only adds strength, but — because the book is mostly made up of double-page spreads — allows all the content to be viewed without a crease going through the middle of the artwork. These comics were originally published in a large newspaper format, which is why the book has been structured this way.

Spiegelman discusses so many serious things here, but a lot of the stories are drawn in the style of historical and classic American newspaper comics. There is a section discussing all the influences on this graphic novel, and even a series of pages showing primary source material that he was inspired by (for example, a Little Nemo in Slumberland comic strip).

In the Shadow of No Towers is a surprisingly short read, but that doesn’t make it any less intense. Definitely worth a look!


Exit Wounds

Review by Matthew Nielsen

Exit Wounds by Rutu Modan is set in Tel-Aviv, Israel, 2002 and follows the story of Koby, a taxi-driver living with his aunt and uncle. He hears news of a suicide bombing in a nearby town and that one of the victims is currently unidentified. This news is brought to him by Numi, a young woman doing her mandatory military service. We discover early in the story that Koby rarely meets or talks to his father, and that Numi is his father’s lover. The story’s journey forward is in trying to figure out whether or not Koby’s father died in that blast.

I will say that I did not like this book very much. This might be due to the overall feel of the book, especially the main character — a general sense of grumpiness, frustration, and even, at times, mean spirits. However, there are also lighter moments, and Modan is able to capture a great range of expressions with minimal amounts of lines.

The artwork consists of selective bold lines filled with block colours. There is next to no shading — no line art cross-hatching, cell-shading, or even gradients. However, the line art itself is sometimes different shades than just plain black, which does create some depth. The absence of shading makes it all feel a bit like looking at a diagram. In general I don’t like the style. Some elements of it appealing: everything is pretty clear and bold, and faces are surprisingly recognizable, but I love detail too much, so this is not my cup of tea.

It’s up to you. If the artwork appeals to you, and if you’re willing to give the grumpy world of Koby a chance, then Exit Wounds might be worth a look. But I didn’t really enjoy it myself.


Cloudscape Comics on Tabulit

We are happy to announce that Cloudscape is now on Tabulit! Tabulit is a digital agency that features a wide range of indie comics available to its subscribers. Mega Fauna  is currently available on the website, with more Cloudscape books to follow, and the site also features The Ghosts We Know, by Cloudscape contributor Sean Karemaker. To see all their available comics, visit the Tabulit website.


The TradeWaiters 31: “Vattu” vol. 1 by Evan Dahm

This week on The Tradewaiters, The Fifth TradeWaiter (a.k.a. Jess Pollard) joins us to talk about Vattu: The Name and the Mark by Evan Dahm. This is the first volume in print of Evan’s epic webcomic project. Listen to us chat about how much we love his work, but more importantly, the reasons why we love it and why you should too. We’ve got a lot to say about webcomics in general this episode.

Also mentioned in this episode:
Rice Boy and Order of Tales, also by Evan Dahm, as well as his illustrated editions of The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum and Moby Dick by Herman Melville.
Questionable Content by Jeph Jacques
Scary Go Round, Bobbins, and Bad Machinery by John Allison
XKCD by Randall Munroe
Dinosaur Comics by Ryan North
Neopets comics
Sluggy Freelance by Pete Abrams
Reinventing Comics by Scott McCloud
Mega Tokyo by Fred Gallagher and Rodney Caston
Shadoweyes by Sophie Campbell
Barbarous by Ananth Hirsch and Yuko Ota
Band Versus Band by Kathleen Jacques
Margaret by Matthew Seely
and The Dregs by Zac Thompson, Lonnie Nadler, and Eric Zawadzki

And our own projects:
Phobos and Deimos by Jonathon Dalton
Crossroads by Jeff Ellis
Lunar Maladies by kgros
Wasted Talent by Angela Melick, and
Liquid Shell by Jess Pollard.

Music by Sleuth.

Our next episode will cover volumes one and two of Your Lie in April by Naoshi Arakawa.

You can also follow the TradeWaiters on Tumblr, Soundcloud, Twitter, iTunes, Google Play, and Stitcher.


Bones of the Coast – Vancouver Is Awesome 2

The blog Vancouver Is Awesome has posted a review of our latest anthology: Bones of the Coast. Reviewer Bob Kronbauer:

“wound up being completely engaged from cover to cover, partly due to the great writing and eclectic styles of more than 20 artists, but because it really screams ‘British Columbia.’ From the Skytrain to BC Ferries to logging roads and the Sea to Sky Highway, the settings are all familiar. The subject matter as well; invasive species, camping, Japanese internment during WWII and more. It’s all wrapped into a horror theme so these somewhat inert subjects (aside from internment, which was actual horror) create worlds that we haven’t entirely inhabited but are still close to.”

To read more, check-out the full Bones of the Coast review.


Cartoon History of the Universe

Review by Matthew Nielsen

Larry Gonick has written numerous educational comic books, including The Cartoon Guide to Chemistry, The Cartoon Guide to Calculus, and even The Cartoon Guide to Sex. But this review focuses on his most famous work, the six-volume Cartoon History of the Universe.

To give an idea of the scale we’re dealing with, here’s a list of all the books in the series:

  • The Cartoon History of the United States (1987) – 400 pages
  • The Cartoon History of the Universe I (1991) – 368 pages
  • The Cartoon History of the Universe II (1994) – 320 pages
  • The Cartoon History of the Universe III (2002) – 320 pages
  • The Cartoon History of the Modern World (2007)272 pages
  • The Cartoon History of the Modern World II (2009)272 pages

So we’re dealing with well over 1900 pages here! I’ll talk about the History of the United States at the end, so starting off withThe Cartoon History of the Universe I, it does indeed provide a history of the universe, but only for one chapter. In fact, at about 50 pages in we’re even done with the dinosaurs, and now it’s on to ancient humankind. So… yeah, a lot is abridged. Even within the book, Larry Gonick (who features as the narrator) mentions how he wishes he could show more, but simply cannot due to time and space constraints. It is a shame though, because learning things can be so much more interesting when they are in comic format.

Anyhoo, the books move on. The way they’re set-up,  the Universe ends and the “Modern World” begins around the time that Columbus discovers America. Go figure. To be honest, the word “Modern” gets used in so many different ways by so many different people that it could easily be whatever you want it to be. Perhaps there was some kind of special publishing reason to change the title between books, but going from “Universe” to “Modern World” doesn’t feel that consistent. I’d prefer if they were all just titled Histories of the World I-V.

Still, Gonick gets the job done, and provide informative, oftentimes humorous, and certainly energetic history lessons, with important bits of information taken from all around the world. There is, of course, stuff missing, but for anyone interested in history in general, The Cartoon History is a great starting point. While I’m at it, I’ll also recommend Crash Course’s World History video series (available for free on YouTube).

As for the illustrations, Gonick’s style is pretty toony, and if you’re okay with that, then there’s not a problem. However, it does get quite messy at points, sometimes faces get oddly distorted, and occasionally the general style of the whole chapter seems to change. For example, in the first book the last chapter felt almost like someone else, not as skillful, had drawn it. Fortunately, the first chapter of the second book went back to normal. Aside from these occasional changes, the art style remains fairly consistent. Furthermore, whilst Gonick may draw toony people, he does a good job on the bits of detail that he chooses to highlights (for example, ancient statue designs).

You will also find footnotes throughout the book illustrated by extra large asterisks, and the bottom three panels or so of the pages often go into more illustrated details. These confused me at first, but quickly I got used to them. As for historical accuracy, I can’t say for sure, though with any historical writing  you’re bound to find the occasional thing that contradicts what other historians have said. You’d best use your best judgement and research to deal with that. All in all, I found these five history books incredibly enjoyable to read. Not only did I learn a great deal of world history, but I also had a lot of fun with the many jokes and curious cartoons. I personally always learn the best from comics, so this was a terrific resource.

To finish up, let’s quickly look at The Cartoon History of the United States. It was written before the other five history books, and it shows. Here Gonick’s art style is much messier and much more stylized. And despite there being more pages in this one book than in any individual books of the other five, there is less content, since there are often less panels on a page, more full-page illustrations. Gonick does go into a lot of detail about the US, but the art style has really put me off of this.

So that’s a full recommendation for The Cartoon History of the Universe I, II & II and The Cartoon History of the Modern World I & II. Due to the messy and art style, I do not recommend The Cartoon History of the United States as much. But it’s still useful historical information, so if you don’t mind the style, you might give that a look too.